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Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences

DOI

10.55730/1300-0144.5390

Abstract

Background/aim: Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a zoonotic viral disease transmitted from dromedaries to humans. To date, more than 1500 cases of MERS have been reported and 80% of all cases have occurred in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). T his cross-sectional study was carried out to figure out the rate of infection among humans and dromedary camels and to explore the risk factors. Materials and methods: This study was conducted in Diyala Province, Iraq for the period from August 2017 to October 2018. Human subjects included 90 participants; 34 (37.8%) were females and 56 (62.2%) were males. Additionally, 90 dromedary camels were also included, 50 (55.6%) males and 40 (44.4%) females. Serum samples from subjects were collected and tested for the presence of antiMERS-coronavirus (CoV) immunoglobulin g (IgG). Results: The results revealed that 46 (51.1%) of human subjects were positive for anti-MERS-CoV IgG, (95% confidence interval (CI) for the prevalence rate 40.9-61.3) with a mean titer of anti-MERS-CoV IgG antibodies (Ab) of 81.2 U/mL. The anti-MERS-CoV IgG positivity rate was insignificantly higher, but the mean of anti-MERS-CoV IgG titer was significantly higher among females (p = 0.12 and p < 0.004, respectively). Furthermore, the anti-MERS-CoV IgG positivity rate and Ab titer were significantly higher among those people who visited KSA for Hajj or Umrah (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). In camels, 81 (90.0%) were positive for anti-MERSCoV IgG, (95% CI for the prevalence rate 82.5-94.9), with a mean titer of 99.8 U/mL. Conclusion: The MERS-CoV infection rate was high among both Iraqi humans and dromedary camels. Further confirmatory studies are needed, and setting up of national precaution program is essential.

First Page

910

Last Page

916

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